Weightlifting

What's to love about CrossFit?

We've all heard of people who try CrossFit and before they know it they're hooked! Dylan Goddard, Head of CrossFit Tanjong Pagar tells us why CrossFit is so popular and worth including in your training regime.

What is CrossFit?

CrossFit is constantly varied functional exercises performed at high intensity - and based on the best functional aspects of weightlifting, running, gymnastics, rowing and more.

In CrossFit you move larger loads over longer distances, so you maximize work done over short periods of time. Intensity is essential for results, and the more you do in less time, or the higher the power output, the more intense the effort.

And with a constantly varied approach to training, these movements at this intensity lead to dramatic fitness gains.

But the most unique thing about CrossFit is you don't do it alone - it's the community that makes it a shining star in the fitness world.

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What's so special about CrossFit?

  • You train alongside strangers who eventually become "family"!
  • The community is a lot bigger than the “Box" you train at, there's an international CrossFit community that is felt worldwide
  • Every class is coached by a qualified coach and classes usually limited to 10-15 people which instills high quality coaching
  • The training program is well thought-out to improve your overall strength and conditioning 
  • There's no judgment, we really strive to advocate the mantra "everyone started at the bottom!"
  • Results will be seen as early as 4 to 6 weeks if the program is followed and nutrition is in check 
  • The scaleability of all CrossFit movements makes it very accessible to everyone 
  • You will have the opportunity to learn skills that will enhance your life inside and outside the gym
  • All are welcome! We've had many people join out CrossFit classes who have never even exercised in their lives before.
  • Every WOD (workout of the day) is different, this allows for constant varied exercises and workouts.

The KEY workouts

Fundamentals: Before you start you do a Fundamentals course to teach you how to do the exercises safely and effectively.

WOD: The “Workout of the Day” is what you perform on a given day. Many follow standard CrossFit WODs, and also do their own programming.

Metcon: "Metabolic conditioning,” trains stamina, endurance and conditioning. Unlike WODs — which can also include purely strength or skill-based workouts— metcons generally include timed components performed at high intensity.

Hero WODs: Named after military servicemen who have died in the line of duty, these provide an extra challenge and reminder of their sacrifice.

Murph: one the toughest WODs, this consists of a one-mile run followed by 100 pull-ups, 200 push-ups, and 300 bodyweight squats. 

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THE BASICS

AMRAP: As Many Reps As Possible over a specific time period. Often lasting 10, 20, or 30 minutes (though it feels a lot longer) AMRAP workouts challenge you to finish as many rounds as you can in the allotted time. Just don't lose count…

Ass to Grass: Get low! Also called “Ass to Ankles,” this is a full-depth squat. 

For Time: Lets you see how you stack up with the rest of the CrossFit world by measuring the time it takes to complete a prescribed workout. 

CrossFit Games: Each summer the CrossFit Games test participants with physical challenges and workouts, ranging from swimming and running to pull-ups and handstand walks. Participants accrue points and the male and female winners are crowned World’s Fittest Man & Woman.

Earlier this year our very own Nazaria Schifra and Stuart Diplock were awarded those titles.

CrossFit Open: Allows competitors to register online and compete on their own or at local CrossFit boxes.

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SOME OF The Movements

Many of these movements are classic exercises you would do in Bootcamps and with your Personal Trainer. However the extra layer that CrossFit adds is the intensity and timed non-stop duration or by the amount of power you put in. 

  • Band assisted pull-up 
  • Bodyweight/Air Squat
  • Box Jump
  • Burpees
  • Double Unders - when a rope passes under your feet twice and you jump only once
  • GHD Sit-Up - sitting face-up on a Glute-Ham Developer reach back until your hands graze the ground, then explosively extend legs and sit up
  • Handstand Push-Up - you can kick up to a wall for stability 
  • Kipping pull-up - when you swing from a bar with rhythm
  • Knees to elbows - when you hang from a pull-up bar
  • Muscle Up -  hang from gymnastic rings and explosively pull your chest above the rings
  • Pistol / single leg squats - which require half the legs, but twice the effort
  • Ring Dip - just like a conventional bodyweight dip, only on gymnastic rings
  • Rope Climb
  • Snatch - explosively lift a weighted barbell from the ground to overhead in one movement
  • Sumo Deadlift High Pull - take a wide stance over a barbell  and explosively pull from the ground upward until the bar comes up to shoulder height
  • Thruster - a front squat straight into a push press
  • Walking lunges - using bodyweight. barbell on the shoulders or weight plate held overhead
  • Wallball throws.
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Come and join us at CrossFit Tanjong Pagar to find out what makes it so special for yourself.

 

NEW PERSONAL TRAINING GYM OPENING at CrossFit Tanjong Pagar!!

We are opening a brand new Personal Training gym in the mezzanine level where you can train with our coaches who have great passion and skill for lifting, CrossFit and strength training.

OPENING LATE SEPTEMBER!!

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BRING YOUR WEIGHTLIFTING SKILLS TO THE NEXT LEVEL

BECOME A BETTER ATHLETE * BECOME A BETTER COACH

Enhance your technical and practical weightlifting skills with coaching from the master himself – Dmitry Klokov - the most sought-after Russian Pro Weightlifter and two time Gold Medal Champion. Come face to face with, and learn from the man who lifted 432kg which won him a silver medal in the 2008 Olympics.

In these small groups, hear Klokov's stories and insights from his experience since lifting from a young age as the son of a weightlifting champion. Let him coach you personally on the latest and greatest methods for maximising strength and power, safely and effectively. 

As Klokov's first visit to Singapore, this is an exclusive opportunity for you to get his guidance on weightlifting movement fundamentals, correct technique, mental strategies and getting the balance between training and recovery right. 

Find out more

Seminar details

  • Practical Olympic weightlifting coaching focusing on the snatch and clean & jerk, based on the Russian system of training, which can be considered as one of many training strategies

  • Correct technique in Olympic lifting and other accessory lifts

  • Ways to maximize your potential as a lifter while progressing quickly yet as safely as possible

  • For both beginners and advanced lifters, either for personal enrichment or to enhance your chosen sport

  • A must for CrossFit athletes, strength coaches, personal trainers or anyone interested in how to make the human body stronger and more powerful.

Seminar dates

  • 29 and 30 June from 5pm

  • 1 July from 9am 

  • 2 July from 9am.

Find out how to join the Weightlifting Legend in Singapore

 

** HOW UFIT's "H" FIRST MET KLOKOV **

 

 

 

Why do Powerlifting by Robynne Smith

In August 2015, someone made a comment to me which has changed my outlook on training ever since. Up until that point, fitness to me was something I did for fun but with the goals purely being to lose fat, get leaner and just be generally all round fit but with no real performance goals. As a result of this comment, I decided to investigate powerlifting.

What is Powerlifting?

Powerlifting is a sport that involves lifting as much weight as possible in three lifts: the back squat, bench press and deadlift. There are two types of powerlifting: equipped, which, as the name suggests, uses more equipment to help you lift as much as possible; and unequipped or classic, which involves minimal equipment. I compete in classic lifting.

Powerlifting is a weight-class based sport, just like Olympic Weightlifting. You compete directly against the lifters in your weight class for who can achieve the highest total weight lifted. A best overall lifter is also awarded, using a ratio between your body weight and total weight lifted.

My Experience

Following a move to Singapore in September 2015 to pursue my Masters degree, I decided I needed to find a coach who could help me get into, and learn more about, powerlifting. Enter UFIT. I started training at the newly opened one-north studio with Tom Clarke. I don’t think he knew quite what he was letting himself in for at the time! After our first few sessions, we decided it would be best if I had a specific goal and therefore found a competition to enter. This would also give me the opportunity to discover if I even enjoyed competing. So together, we worked towards my first meet, which due to recurring knee issues, was a Push-Pull (Bench press and Deadlift only) meet in KL. Tom was meant to be accompanying me to this meet, however, thanks to the wonders of Air Asia his flight got cancelled so there I was heading off to my first competition with no coach and no support, in the back of beyond, in KL. It was an incredibly long and stressful day culminating in a slightly disappointing bench score, a PB in the deadlift and a bronze medal.

Fast forward to April 2016, and I had set Tom the joyous task of preparing me for not just one, but two powerlifting meets in as many weeks, followed by a CrossFit competition, Asia Championships. The first meet was back up in KL, this time successfully accompanied by Tom, and was a much more enjoyable experience, hitting PBs in all three lifts and finishing as the second best female lifter. The second, the School Yard Classic in Singapore, went about as well. Although I only hit a slightly lighter squat, I succeeded in setting the bench, deadlift and total records for my weight class in Singapore. I also finished as the best female lifter overall, my first competition win!

A week later however, due to an e-scooter accident, I ripped the cartilage in my left knee and was sentenced to crutches for 2 months.

During this time, I cannot say enough how much training at UFIT and being coached by Tom kept me sane and on track. While being on crutches shrunk my left leg dramatically, it did wonders for my upper body strength and within about 2 weeks of being allowed to apply force through the leg again, I had broken my previous best bench press by 5kg!

So, to the present day. After 6 months of focussing purely on protection and rehabilitation, I was more than ready to start having another competition to train for. I am now 1 week out from meet day and cannot wait to step back onto the platform, but the prep hasn’t been without its ups and downs. 

Getting Competition Ready

Dropping Weight

As powerlifting is a weight-class based sport, it is necessary to achieve a specific weight on meet day. With weigh-ins being 2 hours before your first lift, and with still being a fairly novice lifter, I want to be happy that I can hit weight a week or so out from competition so I don’t have to stress about water manipulation and so forth. This has meant that since January, while training to increase strength, I have also been trying to drop weight. To do so, I have to carefully track what I eat to ensure that I am fuelled for my training sessions but still in an energy deficit to facilitate that weight loss.

Training

As for training, I am still working with Tom, although remotely, to keep my training as focused as possible. Training includes hitting each of the three competition lifts about twice a week followed by accessory work.  To start, training includes higher volume, up to 10 sets, and more accessory work. As training progresses, volume is decreased while intensity increases and accessory work is reduced. Sessions can easily take up to 2 hours, with an hour alone being spent on the main lifts, inclusive of warming up to the working weight. Rest between sets is also an important factor in strength training, hence the length of the sessions. 

Why do I do it?

Powerlifting gives purpose to my training beyond just training for training’s sake. I am someone who wants to be good at everything, and when I see something I can’t do I want to learn how to do it. Having set goals and a set timeframe, gives me the focus I need to stick to a program and not get distracted by each new, cool technique I discover. I have days when I can’t be bothered and everything just feels super heavy, but I know I need to get the work done. I have days where I want to eat everything in sight, but knowing I have to hit a certain weight helps me to keep controlled, most of the time! Valuing the long term goal over the short term pleasure has been the biggest learning curve during this prep. Sure, I’ve slipped up. I’ve had that piece of cake or cookie but then the next meal I’m back on the plan and I don’t fret about it. I find it much easier to stay on track when I have a definite time line and goal than when I just used to have vague thoughts of “I want to get fit and get abs”!

Finally, getting stronger and seeing my body change through the training cycles has changed me in ways I never could have imagined. I am so much more confident than I ever used to be. I believe in myself and it is much more about what my body can do rather than what it looks like that is important to me. My advice to everyone would be find something you love to do, and then set yourself some goals to keep you on track. Whether that is to run a 5K or a marathon, participate in the CrossFit Open, go for the prize in the UFIT Clean & Lean Challenge or something else entirely, find what motivates you, it really does make all the difference!

If you are interested in what a powerlifting meet involves, how it runs or just how much some of the people there can lift, please feel free to come along and watch the Singapore Powerlifting Open at HomeTeam NS Multipurpose Hall on 1-2 April, admission is free. More details can be found at https://www.facebook.com/events/1835334903380959/ and I will be competing from 2.30pm on 2nd April

Aaron Jones’ top 5 tips to success in weighlifting method, hypertrophy training

Over the past Seven years I have tried and tested most styles of training. From the commando course, to the biggest bench press in the gym. Through these trials I have found what has worked well and what hasn’t worked as well – and here are my tips for what gets me ahead:

1. Mental preparation

Preparing yourself mentally for physical training is just as important as the actual activity. Before every session I make sure I am mentally ready to work as hard as I can. Mental preparation can come in different ways but for me it is to paint a picture in my head of what I am going to achieve. I often head to a coffee shop, listen to some music and read up on different articles of the specific training I am about to do.

2. Break the rules

You don't always need a plan; in fact some plans can restrict you. If your programme says '3 sets of 8 reps' but you know you can squeeze out an extra 2 reps, then don't stop at the 8. Work as hard as you can, not how hard your plan is telling you. Just remember to amend your plan so you continue to push yourself next time as well.

3. Fuel yourself correctly

Hypertrophy training is demanding, period. To put your body through the stresses of this style of training is hard. Hypertrophy training is intended to induce the fastest muscle growth which means that you will be using up a lot of energy. To keep the training sustainable you'll need to fuel your body with the correct nutrients. Food is fuel, so fuel up!

4. Educate yourself

Everyone’s body will react slightly different to the various styles of training. People aiming for aesthetic results will undoubtedly involve hypertrophy training into their regime. However, don't limit yourself to just 1 set of rep ranges. Mix and match the training systems, get some strength sets in (1-3 reps) as well as the generic hypertrophy 8-12 reps. This way you will get the benefits of strength training as well as the added benefits from the hypertrophy training. This is what has worked best for me. Learn about your body by trying to mix up the rep ranges and look at how your body reacts to it.

5. Track your progress

Hypertrophy training isn't orientated around numbers, so it can be difficult to track the progress you make. Fortunately, the results of hypertrophy are usually more visual than any other training system. Take pictures and be proud of them. Know how far you have come, and look forward to the progress you’re going to make. 

About the Author

Aaron Jones is UFIT’s hypertrophy specific training personal trainer. Aaron joined the British Army at the age of 17 and passed the All Arms Commando Course at the age of 18. Aaron stayed in the army and completed 4 years in the military. It is Aaron’s passion for training that encouraged him to join the army. It is through this passion that Aaron hopes to assist you in your goals.

About UFIT

At UFIT, we exist to inspire and guide our community of members, to realise levels of fitness and confidence beyond what could be possible by themselves. Fitness isn’t our job; it is our way of life. 

Check us out on our website or you can take a look at our Facebook page

Join us – the opportunities are endless. 

Catch up with one of Singapore's fittest men - CrossFit Tanjong Pagar's Head Coach Dylan Goddard

CrossFit Tanjong Pagar’s Head Coach, Dylan Goddard was Singapore’s fittest CrossFit athlete in 2015. We managed to get 30 minutes with him to get the inside track on how top athletes prepare themselves physically and mentally for competitions. 

We picked his brains on nutrition, pain management, training and asked him how he sees CrossFit developing in Singapore.

1.     Where did your passion for fitness start?

Straight from Safa land (South Africa). I’ve been in Singapore for five years and always had a passion for health and fitness. Previously I took part in competitive body building for three-four years, grappled with MMA and competitive mountain biking. My real passion for CrossFit started four years ago and really took to competing two-three years from then and I haven’t looked back since. My real passions stem from passing on knowledge to clients at the box, progression in human movement and performance from the moment they start their journey at the box.

2.     What does it take to become one of the fittest men in Singapore?

It all comes down to living a disciplined lifestyle.  I am incredibly driven to constantly improve and by my passion for the sport, so I am able to stay focused and make certain sacrifices.  I am pretty tough on myself to ensure I am always pushing on in strength, mobility and performance.

I live by the 1% rule.  Every time I walk in to CrossFit Tanjong Pagar or any other box around the world, as long as I give 1% more than the day or week before, that’s all that counts.

3.     What gives you the edge?

It comes down to one thing for me - mental strength. I believe that training the brain is a vital component of achieving personal bests. Whether it be a pre-workout meditation, where I focus on the goal and how good it will feel when I achieve it, or having the ability to push past pain barriers in the midst of a tough WoD. 

It’s not just the quantity of training, it is the quality of the work and effort that you give to your sessions. You can only give the best quality if your mind is truly present and alive to the goal.

4. What's your favourite type of training and why?

It’s hard to choose, but I would say endurance based workouts.  I think I am quite mentally tough which helps me to focus and get through pain barriers, often allowing me to get ahead of other competitors.

I also enjoy experimenting with how far I can push my body.

5. How do you get competition ready?

Generally, the workouts are released a few weeks in advance of all competitions. In CrossFit; technique needs to be perfect. Your body adapts to different styles and movements and you need to make sure you are ready to take on those challenges in the most efficient way possible.

 These three steps help me to focus and achieve great results;

  1. Perfecting the technique of the movements in the correct sequence
  2. Trust in your training programme – the hay is already in the barn!
  3. Confidence in your approach – no stress and no cramming!

6. What's the next competition for you?

It’s an awesome Team based competition that CrossFit Tanjong Pagar are stoked for; it’s the Manilla Throwdown on the 4th – 5th November, which is one of the biggest competitions in Asia. We have three really talented teams representing CrossFit Tanjong Pagar.

  • The Dream Team – Daryl Cheng (Singapore 2016 CrossFit Champion) /Trisha Tan and myself Dylan Goddard (Head Coach at CrossFit Tanjong Pagar, CFTP)
  • Triple Jizzle - John Cheah (CFTP Coach), Jordan Fitzpatrick (CFTP Coach) and Jenna Laughlin
  • The A Team – Annie Set,  Evan Partsch and Stefano Scuratti

7. What does it take mentally to focus your mind when you're competing?

There are several steps that help to keep me focused, here are my top three:

  1. Breathing techniques before warming up to reset the mind
  2. Believe in yourself – this is your time to shine
  3. Dealing with the pain before it actually it happens. I re-live past workouts to remember what the pain felt like.  

8. How does your diet change before, during and after a competition?

This depends on the type of competition. For a one-day competition my diet doesn’t change before at all. I tend to stick to my normal regime the night before, and then on the day, I wake up early and have a carb rich breakfast, such as oatmeal and I avoid too much fat.

Throughout the day I make sure I take lots of liquid nutrition, such as a pure carbohydrate sports drink like Gatorade. Due to the Asian climate, I have to be militant about ensuring that my electrolytes are replaced throughout the day with water and Nuun tablets. If I am feeling a bit flat before the competition starts I will usually take a pre workout to get pumped. In the evening I like to enjoy a well-earned BIG FAT meal. 

For multi day events that last between two – three days I stick to the same breakfast. After workouts I refuel with a protein shake, sugar and carbohydrates. Again it is absolutely essential to make sure electrolytes are replaced.  A typical meal will include a rice base with vegetables and protein which will always be fish or chicken.  Sushi, rice, salmon and tuna are foods that we are able to digest really quickly, giving the body maximum time for replenishment and recovery.  I never eat anything I haven’t eaten before and make sure I get enough rest. 

9.     Who and what keeps you motivated and why?

CrossFit competitions are tough! Being able to share the experience and journey with others, helps me keep my form and stay on top of my game. As an individual competitor you’re accountable for only yourself, but as a team competitor you train together which is certainly more fun, and the overall pressure is reduced. I certainly seem to perform a lot better this way.

The motivation I take from CrossFit Tanjong Pagar’s coaches and members, as well as those at our Sister box CrossFit BukitTimah is huge. Seeing members progress, reminds me every day that with a little bit of effort, the results can be astonishing.  Knowing I am representing the box and our communities in competitions keeps me hungry for more.  As we get to the Regionals and Pacifics, I get to stand proud and show what we can do - this is my box, my space and knowing that we’ve built a network and community that inspires us every single day is inspiration itself. 

 

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” Aristotle


About the Author 

Dylan has worked in the fitness industry for the past 8 years. Having started his career in his home town of Cape Town, South Africa, Dylan has since gained international exposure by making a move to Singapore to pursue his passion of health and fitness. This passion is evident in the way he carries himself in the box, ensuring he gives 110% in all that he does.

Dylan is a qualified personal trainer and holds a National Certificate in Personal Training from the National Federation of Professional Trainers (NFPT), United States. He joined the CrossFit community and hopes to inspire and motivate people in this way of training and living out a healthy, full lifestyle. He has also attained his CrossFit Level 1 Certification.


About CrossFit Tanjong Pagar

WHO WE ARE

CrossFit Tanjong Pagar is Singapore’s leading CrossFit box located in the heart of the CBD. We are proud to boast the largest training facility of its kind, with air-conditioning, top CrossFit certified trainers and a positive environment that helps create a diverse and successful community.

WHAT WE DO

CrossFit Tanjong Pagar was formed solely to provide the best training, coaching, community, and results that Singapore has to offer. Our coaches design and implement functional training programs to strengthen your body, heart, mind, and soul.

Get in touch to take the first steps with your Free Trial, Fundamentals or if you’re in town walk in and say hey we would love to meet you!