Healthy Lifestyle

Clean & Lean with the Greens

After last Christmas, Scott and Sheri Green decided to treat their bodies and kick off the new year with the some Clean & Leaning. It was totally worth it - Scott lost nearly 5% body fat and 7kg in the four weeks, and Sheri lost nearly 6% body fat and almost 4kg. They now share with us, after doing the UFIT Clean & Lean Challenge four times - how they have felt, how it fit into their lifestyle, and why they would do it again:

1. How often have you done UFIT Clean & Lean and how were the results?

I have done UFIT Clean & Lean four times. The first time I did it by myself and twice I did it with Scott. We both got great results each time. I think Scott saw the results and what a benefit it was for me after the first time so he wanted to know what it would do for him. He eats less sugar than me and was very surprised by what he learnt.

2. Why do it again after learning the principles the first time?

I loved the way I felt and what I learned the first time so I did it again and learnt even more. The truth is it's hard for me to take sugar out completely forever. I'm human and the bad habits creep back in, a holiday comes around or you have a party to go to, and sugar is addictive after all.

But I like to reset, and to learn more. Each time I have done it I have taken something else from it and been educated more. Sometimes you think you are making a healthy choice purely by the way a product is advertised, I think this was the biggest thing I learnt. I thought I was being quite healthy but when you really strip it back you are surprised.

3. How has it been doing it with your husband - and balancing with a social life and three little kids?

You get so much support from Wendy, Noa and everyone else through the Facebook page but having Scott do it with me really helped. We saw the changes in each other and enjoyed exercising together. It's had only has a positive effect on our family, having three kids can be a challenge at dinner time, that's never going to change but if I can get them to try a new thing and its healthy and they like it then that's fab. My oldest daughter now prefers Shepherd's pie with cauliflower mash instead of potato. My son enjoys coming to Bootcamp with me. We have had lots of little changes from doing Clean & Lean. I learnt if you plan your meals it makes it easier and you make better choices.

4. What pushed you through when it all felt a bit challenging?

The main thing that pushed me through the four weeks was what I learnt each week. The community also pushes you through, it makes you accountable. Wendy and Noa help you through each week, they have done it / are doing it themselves and have all the answers you need to get through it.

5. Apart from looking great, how did your body feel during and after the Challenge?

For me, I saw so many changes. At the beginning I'm not gonna lie, it's hard to see what sugar does to you, but as the time goes on and you see the benefits, actually very quickly you see changes. Other people see changes too. My energy levels improved, my skin was nice, my moods were more stable and then there are the changes you see in your clothes, they fit better, even get too big. These are just a few things but there are so many more.

6. Has it been manageable to continue with it after the Challenge?

UFIT Clean & Lean has helped me live a much healthier lifestyle. I have also found a love of excercise I didn't know I had.  I have taken the things I learned going forward to make better choices.

7. Would you do it again and why?

I will do UFIT Clean & Lean again I'm sure. The easy part for me is the four weeks, It's the part after I find harder. That's my challenge and always will be, but now at least I have the knowledge to be able to make the right choices.

8. Scott - do you have anything to add?

No - Sheri's said it all! But I would add just one thing - I don't feel right when I'm not on Clean & Lean.

Join us at the next UFIT Clean & Lean Challenge that starts on 26 August!

Safe to say I'm converted to be Clean and Lean for 90% of the time thanks to the UFIT Clean & Lean Challenge

About me: Trampoline Performance Coach and retired Army Captain. Former National Level trampoline competitor in the UK and Billy all sports, 31 years young.

WHY: 2016 saw a lot of injury and the last part leading to Christmas I had a broken wrist resulted in limited exercise and a noticeable amount of weight gain (to me) and definition Loss. I use sugar to get through the day as I coach solidly for up to 6 hours at a time. My skin is bad and I have diet related gastro problems which I know is down to a poor eating habits. I blooming love a pudding, this girl can eat chocolate cake quicker than Bruce Bogtrotter. 

Worries: My job is extremely active, I bounce at least 2 hours a day, not including fitness classes and my own exercise. I am nervous of 'diets' due to eating disorders as a teen and in my early 20's and worry that a massive change will lead to obsession and a return of previous issues. 

Week 1: Firstly, how the HECK am I 25% body fat, that crept up on me... I work Saturdays and have to miss the seminars so the initial email on Friday helped to prepare for day 1. I started on the Friday evening and the food was not too bad. However my first issue, I do not like Avocado, cucumber or celery... so that limited my initial options for lunch. I must admit the Facebook group is great for ideas and different options for recipes. I got through Sunday fairly well and felt (albeit tired) alright. Monday was the first stupid idea... Bootcamp... I was dizzy, struggled in strength and the old army mentality of 'just get on with it' came through. My body is a machine, oh wait no it's not it doesn't want to work for me at all. Headache for the rest of the day and although smashed a staple lunch of spinach wrap, with chicken and bacon I was still hungry. I just couldn't find the energy so avoided prep that night ate my Shepard’s pie from the freezer and thought I'd go for a 'Daily Cut' for lunch... FAIL I am a bit of a nightmare with lettuce that isn't crisp and after the journey to work I managed to heave for about 5 mins trying to eat broccoli, before giving up and just eating the chicken. All I managed Tuesday was eggs and salmon for breakfast, chicken breast for lunch and ham as a snack. I did eat a pre-made Shepard’s pie for dinner at 10pm and then prepped like a mad person for the rest of the week... I WILL NOT BE DEFEATED and actually after Wednesday morning trampoline fitness and a busy schedule for the rest of the week with hands on coaching I survived.  Only as a result of preparation!  the 7P's spring to mind.... Went to the cinema with a pack of whole kitchen seeds and a water bottle, I tend to belt feed a large sweet popcorn bag before the movie starts so for me this is a Result!! Drinking water is not a problem, I tend to drink lots anyhow but a skinny cappuccino with a sweetener has been missed that's for sure.

Week 2: Yay for tomatoes! Oh wait I don't eat tomatoes either. The first meal was roasted veg (mainly green) with Carrots and peppers, they tasted extremely sweet after the sugar purge. I feel like I'm savouring the flavours. After the lessons learnt from week 1, I am prepared and even Managed a jog on Sunday evening. I am still feeling a little Low on energy at times and have succumbed to become one of those people who buys protein. I made protein balls with cacao for a hit while at work between bouncing. Only taken 31 years and needs must. Clothes feel looser, skin is becoming clearer and stomach has settled. My Tuesday from last week was a whole lot different this week. Prepped a decent 'big' lunch and snacks, finished work at 8 and went straight to Hockey training. A year out and you could tell, but I managed to run around like a lunatic for 1.5 hours. Finished the week very stiff and continued with being busy at work. Sleep has been an issue with cramp and just not settling, so invested in Magnesium supplements which has been brilliant. I went to a BBQ and ate so much meat. Took green pepper and carrot sticks with me and soda, watching everyone having a few drinks was slightly annoying but stuck with it. I have managed to 'accidentally' fast for 3 days this week after the seminar on Wednesday as I do not start work until late so actually it's not too bad to wait for lunch. Other than sleep being a pain towards the tail end of the week a much better week for energy... I didn't feel the need to eat quite a lot of the time.

Week 3: OVER HALFWAY!!! Survived 50% and looking forward to adding some sweet potato and beetroot to the diet. Went for a slow and steady 4.6 Mile jog as Since Hockey training my legs have been very sore. Actually had a protein shake and feel ok for it. Preparing hard on the Sunday for the week as it's set to be a busy one. Consciously upping the exercise this week as with the added carbs I hope I can take it. Monday bootcamp I had much more energy and no dizziness. Managed to push myself harder and wasn't 'at the back', body is aching but fueling well. I may have found a faux pas CASHEW BUTTER seriously the restraint not to devour the whole pot is tremendous. But I have made my protein balls using this for a second batch and actually since the revelation I haven't dived a in with a teaspoon since the first few days of having it. 

You can't always plan ahead, being reactive is important and A busy week at work has resulted in only managing my own exercise (other than bouncing) 2 times. But had 2 trampoline fitness classes to deliver and also sporting a slight strain from Too many lunges from Bootcamp and Hockey at the start of the week so some rest is probably needed... stuck to the plan and even resisted my boss's Husband placing a glass of red wine in front of me (he must have thought I needed it) I refused, it smelt so good but restraint (for once) stood strong. Awesome compliments from the parents of the kids I coach saying how great I look and how incredible my skin is, a brilliant boost to enforce the effort going into sticking to the plan. 

Week 4: WOW how is it the last week already.?!? Start as you mean to go on, 9 hours solid coaching on Saturday and an impromptu trip to my boss's meant a late run. But I am slowly increasing speed and the first run since the start that I haven't wanted to collapse. Obstacle Bootcamp Sunday morning and again feeling good, weirdly satisfying burning your legs and working your arms up on ropes, how I miss that part of the Army... I prepared food for the week in a form of curry for lunches when I'm too busy and also making sure I don't forget that green should be the staple. I'm finding myself less hungry but feeling like I 'should' eat for the sake of not overdoing the diet and not fueling myself properly. Finding the balance I Guess will be important this week... I have lots of exercise planned and want to really work hard to find my fitness while maintaining a Clean and Lean diet. Also CHEESE... my hand brake. Just need to remember to alternate days as otherwise overindulgence is inevitable. The True protein from UFIT Amoy Street (chocolate flavour) has not only stopped my need for the sweet tooth but dare I say it aided in the recovery process and also general aches and pains after exercise. From a non-believer in protein powder, I am converted and it will definitely form part of my recovery and exercise routine. With only 3 days before my weigh out, I have managed a good amount of exercise and also learnt lots about what I do and don't need with regards to food, I am a little sporadic in my food choices after exercise as most of the time I do not eat dinner until after work at 10pm opting quite a lot of the time for snacks rather than a meal, which means a big lunch but I'm ok with that as an option to go forward... Another brilliant Wednesday seminar to help with the final push and feeling positive about the changes to make afterwards. Also picked up some shorts to wear to work and have had to roll them up as they are falling down. Jumping on a trampoline today may add some hidden entertainment, never a dull moment. Typical the day before I weight out I'm having a wobble, feel like scrounging around the kitchen to look for something sweet... hoping today flies by without too much stress... so you can't control hormones and the last bit one day out from weigh in has resulted in my body playing up. But I am sticking to it, support from friends and UFIT's own Lizzie Wright has been helpful as sometimes you just need a kick up the butt. Even managed a 5k run in quickest time since before my wrist break in October so something must be going ok. 

The weigh out: After the last day of feeling pretty bad (although staying true) I didn't have much hopes and could not believe it when I jumped on the scales and the first number was 56!! 56KG is below my pre-army 'fit' weight and I was truly shocked. I know I've felt good at times and many have complimented the way I'm looking which has been nice, but to actually see the hard work in facts and figures gives you that measurable outcome to the process.

Safe to say I’m converted to be Clean and Lean for 90% of the time, no one likes a goody too shoes after all. 

Reflection:  So in 4 weeks I have lost 4.5KG, 4.5% body fat and also 5cm from my waist, my skin has massively improved and I have slowly managed to control my hunger and need for sugar. I have found myself in a place where I am really happy with how I feel and look. The energy is starting to come back because of careful planning in food preparation and I am feeling confident about keeping with it and trying to build back into the Athlete I once was. I fully recommend the clean and lean process to those who do not just want to lose weight but for those who want an education about how to take control of your diet and not be a slave to the evolution of poor eating and poor diet choices. It's all about moderation and for me my process will continue with the odd cheat day here and there. Thank you UFIT and especially Wendy and Noa for the support and guidance over the last 4 weeks, also the community Facebook group has been awesome. Safe to say I'm converted to be Clean and Lean for 90% of the time, no one likes a goody too shoes after all. 


UFIT CLEAN & LEAN CHALLENGE

The 2017 Clean & Lean sessions are happening on March 11 – April 8 (4 weeks), May 20 – June 17 (4 weeks), September 2 – 30 (4 weeks), November 4 – 25 (4 weeks).

UFIT is Singapore’s largest independent fitness community that offers a 360 approach to health and fitness island wide. For more information, visit our website.

 

Say no to sugar

Sugar is a natural product, found in a variety of natural foods such as fruit, vegetables, grains, legumes and dairy products. It is a nutritional value is that it breaks down quickly and supplies the brain and muscles with instant energy for their function. However, consuming too much sugar will cause us to gain weight. Studies show that the average person consumes around 22 teaspoons of sugar a day from food, snacks and drinks. This is about 3 to 4 times more than the recommended intake advised by the American Dietician Association.

The damage caused by consuming too much sugar overtime is wide and does not stop on the scale. Most of the problem is due to the consumption of white sugar and the corn or fructose syrup added to our processed food and drinks. Even though it has been well known for many years that these products are damaging our health, the consumption of processed food and sweetened drinks keeps increasing.

Why should we limit our sugar consumption?

1. Sugar creates fat around the internal organs

Sugar (sucrose) as well as corn syrup contain fructose. Consuming too much of them will create burden on the liver, that has to convert fructose into glucose, which our cells use for energy. The excess fructose will be stored in the liver and around it as fat cells. Fatty liver is damaging the liver functionality and long term this might cause cirrhosis.

2. Sugar Causes Insulin Resistance

Insulin is a hormone that regulates human metabolism. Insulin is secreted by the pancreas whenever we eat something that contains sugar. The Insulin hormone sends a signal to the cells that they should put transporters for glucose onto their surface, thereby allowing glucose to get into the cells where it can be used to generate energy. When we eat sugar, glucose levels rise and Insulin levels rapidly increase in order to absorb the glucose from the bloodstream and into the cells.

However, when too much fat is accumulated, especially around our internal organs, our cells become resistant to the effects of insulin. In response, the pancreas will secrete even more insulin in order to insert the glucose into the cells. The problem is that insulin has additional functionality. One is to send signals to our fat cells, telling them to pick up fat from the bloodstream, store it and to also signal the fat cells to avoid burning the fat stored in them. Unfortunately, this is a vicious cycle, as it will generate more fatty cells and worsen the cell’s resistance to insulin.

Because of the resistance to insulin, the glucose doesn't enter the cells properly and fat storage doesn't break down into energy as well and we feel lack of energy and hunger. As a result we eat more and gain more fat.

Consistent resistance to Insulin will lead eventually to Type 2 Diabetes.

3. Sugar increases our risk to suffer from Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person’s blood sugar to be too high, and in time might damage other vital systems in the body. Type 2 diabetes is caused by combination of genetics and lifestyle factors. Being overweight does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. In addition, a diet high in sugar from any source contributes as well. Research has proven that drinking sugary/sweetened drinks is linked to type 2 diabetes.

4. Sugar causes overeating situations

Studies show that excessive consumption of sugar damages the ability of our body to signal the brain that we are not hungry any more. The reason for that is that high levels of sugar in our bloodstream cause our brain to become intolerant to a hormone called Leptin. In a normal healthy situation, Leptin is secreted by fat cells when they become bigger. When the brain senses the increased Leptin levels, it signals to our body that we are full and we have enough fat stored for rainy days. When the brain develops resistance to Leptin, it doesn't get the message that the fat cells are full of fat. This situation leads to increased food intake and decreased fat burning.

5. Sugar affects the blood lipids

Blood lipids such as LDL and HDL cholesterol are markers of the biological processes that impact cardiovascular disease. When we think about the impact of food on blood lipids, dietary fat typically comes to mind. Yet a new study shows that dietary carbohydrate, specifically high-fructose corn syrup, can have a large impact on blood lipid markers of cardiovascular disease risk. Researchers noticed that "bad" cholesterol and triglyceride levels spiked in those people who consumed more sugar then others. One of the assumptions for this phenomenon is that the sugar damage to the liver, causing the liver to produce more cholesterol than needed.

6. Sugar affects the heart

Excessive consumption of sugar increases the blood lipids in the arteries, which raises blood pressure and increases the chance of having a heart attack or stroke. In fact, 65% of the people suffering from unbalanced type 2 diabetes, die from heart attack or stroke.

7. Sugar affects Alzheimer disease

New study proves that there is strong correlation between high consumption of sugar and the increased risk of Alzheimer’s. The study shows how the decreased ability to produce energy from glucose has negatively affected brain metabolism and created damage to the brain neurons. It has been referred to and named as "brain diabetes".

8. Sugar is addictive

Sugar affects the brain in a similar way to drugs such as opiates, alcohol and other legal and illegal drugs. It affects the pleasure centre of the brain by increasing the serotonin, dopamine and endorphin levels. As a result, the body develops tolerance to glucose in the same way it does for other drugs. In time, in order to feel good, we will need more of the sugar. Studies conducted on rats showed serious withdrawal symptoms such as anxiety and tremor when the rats were banned from sugar. No wonder so many of us find it so hard to reduces the intake of sugar in our daily diet.

9. Sugar make you tired

Sugar makes you more alert and energetic for a short period of time. However, this energy does not last for longer than 30 minutes. Thereafter the energy level drops significantly and you feel exhausted and drained, this is referred as ‘sugar rollercoaster’.

10. Sugar damages the skin

Sugar cause insulin levels to spike, which leads to a burst of inflammation throughout the body. Inflammation produces enzymes that break down collagen and elastin. Digested sugar permanently attaches to the broken collagen through a process known as glycation. The result is sagging skin, wrinkles and higher sensitivity to the sun. Aside from increasing the effects of aging, glycation can also exacerbate skin conditions like acne and rosacea. 


My advice:

  •  Avoid sugary drinks, even fresh juices. Always consume water.
  • Reduce the number of sweets and treats that you are having.
  • Carefully read the food labelling. Sugar is sneaky and has different naming.
  • Remember even processed products such as sauces, dairy items, bread and others might have a high quantity of sugar in them.
  • Avoid the white stuff - white sugar, white flour, white rice etc. These provide you only with pure energy and no other nutrients.
  • No need to avoid sugar completely. However, make sure that the sugar that you are consuming comes from legumes, starchy vegetables and whole grains.

If you feel you need something sweet, go for the healthier option which includes high quality dark chocolate, fresh whole fruits, dried fruits, honey, or coconut sugar. Remember these are still sugars so watch the quantities.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Noa has been practicing as a Clinical Nutritionist for the last ten years. Her specialties include weight loss, Celiac disease, digestive system problems and metabolic diseases.

Noa focuses on providing the right moral support for all her clients, combined with a customised nutritional program. Through this, Noa assists her clients to change their lives for the best – improving their health, energy levels, sleep, and overall wellbeing. 

Read more


For more information for UFITs Nutrition programs get in touch with us here. Join our next Clean & Lean Challenges that we run 5 times a year providing you with the opportunity to change your healthy habits into a lifestyle.

Homemade Chicken Tikka | UFIT Kitchen

A tasty and simple dish for the whole family to enjoy. 

INGREDIENTS:

  • 6 barbecue skewers
  • 250g chicken breast
  • 1 red onion
  • 1 green capsicum
  • 1 tomato
  • 2 tbsp dried tikka spices (double check that there's no sugar added)
  • 1 lime - wedged
  • Cilantro to taste
  • Coconut oil (just a little bit for brushing after sprinkling the spices)

METHOD: 

1. Cut the chicken into cubes. Place in a bowl and toss 1 tbsp of spices.
2. Cover with paper wrap and store on the fridge.
3. In the meantime, chop the vegetables in chunks.
4. Put the skewers under water for 30 seconds. Assemble the skewer by mixing the chicken, onion, capsicum and tomato. Then place on a baking tray.
5. Use a brush with coconut oil to “paint the skewers" and sprinkle the remaining tbsp of spices on the skewers.
6. Bake in a preheated oven to 200 for 15-20 minutes.


For more information for UFITs Nutrition programs get in touch with us here. Join our next Clean & Lean Challenges that we run 4 times a year providing you with the opportunity to change your healthy habits into a lifestyle.

Thanks to @Soff.it for providing these deliciously creative recipes.

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Taking our nutrition on holiday

The holiday season is here again and we are just about to take a flight to another exotic destination or are on our way to another dinner party. 

In many cases, the minute we are on the plane, we forget everything we know about proper eating and let go of our boundaries and discipline. 

No matter where you are travelling to and for how long, you need to keep paying attention to what you eat. It doesn't mean you need to ban yourself completely from carbohydrates, alcohol or trying local special foods. Nor does it mean you need to spend your entire holiday at the gym or swim across the ocean every day. However, here are some basic things you CAN easily do without putting too much effort into it and will help you prevent collateral damage:

1.  Set your goals and keep them realistic:

When going on a holiday a reasonable goal will be to keep your weight steady as opposed to keep losing weight. 

If you set yourself a goal that is unrealistic, you set yourself to failure. Failure leads to disappointment, which in many cases can make you fall off the wagon as an act of rebellion. On the other hand, succeeding in keeping your goals will motivate you to keep going.

2. Set yourself defined boundaries:

Humans act better when they have boundaries. Set some boundaries, however, have some freedom within the limitations you set. 

For example I decided that I am going to limit my sugar intake this holiday, however, I won’t totally abstain it.  Hence, on one of the days during my holiday I will go ahead and try this nice dessert and on another day I will drink a tempting cocktail.  Alternatively, for example, I will avoid eating carbohydrates, on the other hand I will allow myself to drink a glass of wine every evening during my holiday. This practice enables me to enjoy different food/drink variety without losing my head completely. 

3. Planning ahead:

Planning is a key factor that enables one to succeed. It will prevent you from being too hungry and giving into temptations that will make you feel bad later on.

Plan your holiday from the moment you are at the airport. Pack a box of vegetables for the flight, take some snacks such as nuts, almonds, seeds, grain less granola with you. If you are off to an active holiday such as trekking or skiing, take some dried fruits with you to keep your energy levels up.

Plan your meals!

 For example, if I plan to spend my holiday in a nice resort I will have eggs and vegetables for breakfast and avoid the other goodies.  As snacks I will have my nuts and seeds and occasionally fruit. For lunch I can have a big salad with a protein such as tuna or chicken and for dinner I will enjoy the local cuisine and a glass of wine.

Plan the Christmas dinner, visualise the dinner, think about your choices. If you are hosting and cooking, make sure to prepare something that is suitable for you to eat. If you don't want to eat too much make sure to eat all your daily meals as per normal and don't starve yourself because you have a big dinner ahead. This might cause you to overeat and feel very heavy. 

4. Make the right food choices:

Most of your plate should be full with vegetables. Other than that the emphasis should be on proteins (eggs, meat, chicken, fish, tofu) and good fats (olive oil, nuts, seeds, avocado, olives, butter, coconut oil). Some legumes and whole grains can be eaten in smaller portions. Remember that proteins, fats and food with high fibre content will enhance feelings of fullness.

As for desserts, try to avoid or plan in advance to enjoy a nice dessert on a specific occasion, and then just enjoy it without guilt feelings.

5. One plate is enough:

Whether it is Christmas dinner, a hotel meal, or any restaurant meal, remember that one plate is enough. You do not have to try all of the food varieties. Look and assess your options, choose and fill up your plate only once.  As mentioned before, if you are starving you will end up eating without control, so make sure not to skip meals. 

When you finish your plate it is better to step away from the table, help clear it and go for a walk. The more you sit around the table, it's more likely you will be tempted to keep on eating. 

6. Eat slowly, chew well, relax and enjoy your meal:

Remember it takes 15-20 minutes from the first bite, till the satiety signals reach the brain. Eating too quickly will make you eat much more than you really need. 

7. Limit your alcohol intake:

The problem with drinking alcoholic beverages is not only they contain lots of sugar and calories, but also that they stimulate your appetite and it’s even worse once you are tipsy you forget about your intentions to keep a healthy diet. 

I’m not suggesting to avoid alcohol completely, however, limiting it and sticking with wine or white spirits will minimise the damage. 

8. Keep moving:

It is totally fine to rest from your routine training regime. However make movement part of your holiday. This will help you relax, ventilate and stay fit. 

You can go for a walk (including shopping), hire a bike, take the stairs instead of the lift, swim, scuba dive, kayak, ski or anything else that gets you up and about. 

9. The swimsuit trick:

This is the best trick in the book! 

If you are off to a sunny beach holiday, wearing your swimsuit, and specially your bikini most of the day will help suppress your appetite, try it!!

Remember, it can take you up to one month to fix the damage done by one week of uncontrolled holiday of eating and drinking. Be good and most of all enjoy your holidays wherever you are!!

Noa Harari - UFIT Nutrition Team


ABOUT NOA

Noa has been practicing as a Clinical Nutritionist for the last ten years. Her specialties include weight loss, Celiac disease, digestive system problems and metabolic diseases.

Noa understands that no human being resembles another.  She believes that each one of us is created differently and has different needs. She recognises that the best way to get long term results is by creating a personalised program for each individual client. Read more here.


For more information for UFITs Nutrition programs get in touch with us here. Join our next Clean & Lean Challenges that we run 4 times a year providing you with the opportunity to change your healthy habits into a lifestyle.